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Lake view with mountains in the background in Maine

Explore America’s Northeast Corner

Where Major Cities meet Tiny Towns
The Northeast region packs in some of America’s most iconic attractions within a few states of each other. This one road trip through the region will have you strolling the streets of New York City and hiking some of the most magnificent state parks in the country. The New England region is home to some of America’s very first states, and the historical imprints of that time can be found throughout. A trip to the area can reasonably include many of New England’s must-see states, as well as stops in D.C. and The Big Apple.
The capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

As the capital of the United States, Washington, D.C. is chock full of must-see attractions, which means you’ll need at least a few days here before setting off northward.

Washington, D.C. is home to some of the most famous structures in the country, including the Smithsonian, the Lincoln Memorial and, of course, The White House. While much of D.C. life revolves around government and politics, there are plenty of museums, parks and cultural attractions to discover.

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The Washington Monument in the Mount Vernon neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore, Maryland

From DC, venture to Maryland, a Mid-atlantic state whose culture, geography and history contain elements of the Northeastern, as well as Southern regions of the country.

Though small in size, Maryland is home to a wide variety of geographical features, almost 6,500 kilometers of shoreline and the city some have called one of the coolest in the Northeast-- Baltimore. But to determine if that’s true, you’ll have to make the trip yourself.

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Boardwalk in Rehoboth, Delaware

Delaware

Delaware was one of the United State’s original 13 colonies, and as the first to sign the Constitution, it’s known as the First State.

The First State also happens to be the second smallest in the country, but don’t worry-- there’s plenty to do and see within Delaware’s borders. Comprising many little towns, each with its own charm and personality, a roadtrip through Delaware offers beach destinations, riverside stops and lots of history.

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  • Check out the historical town of New Castle, Delaware's first capital founded in 1651. While you’re there, visit the Court House Museum.
  • Small town, coastal vibes on the Atlantic Ocean can be found at Bethany Beach.
  • Catch the action on the bustling boardwalk at Delaware's most visit, Rehoboth Beach, and be sure to stop by Dolles for some famous salt-water taffy.
The Statue of Liberty and New York City, New York, skyline

New York City, New York

If you’ve never been to the five boroughs, you’re in for a treat--just make sure to bring comfortable shoes, as New York’s a city best traveled by foot.

From Broadway to the Financial District, you’ll see countless attractions that make up the quintessential New York City itinerary, but don’t stop there. The hidden and more counter-culture aspects of New York are part of the city’s magic, as well. Whether you’re into food, art, shopping or something else entirely, you can count on getting your fill of it in New York City.

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  • Try the Classic New York breakfast sandwich: smoked fish on a bagel from Russ & Daughters.
  • Make your way to the edgy and trendy Lower East Side, for ramen at Ivan Ramen.
  • Everyone claims they know where the best pizza in New York is, but we personally recommend grabbing some from Roberta’s in Manhattan, or their original Brooklyn location.

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  • Catch a Broadway show, and then take a stroll through the always-electric Times Square.
  • Head downtown and grab a ferry to the The Statue of Liberty.
  • Pause your urban exploration with a nature break in Central Park.
  • Walk the Brooklyn Bridge for a scenic route to the popular borough, Brooklyn.
Sailboats on the water in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Massachusetts

Massachusetts is home to several high-profile cities and towns including Boston, the state’s capital, as well as Salem and Plymouth, both historically significant in the United States.

You can explore those areas and more on a trip through the state. Boston, the most populous city in New England, is one of the oldest municipalities in the country, and you’ll certainly feel the living history of the city when you go. Compliment your urban adventure with some nature days in Massachusetts’ state parks and a journey to the ever popular Cape Cod, a well-known summer destination famous for its quaint villages and tasty seafood shacks.

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  • For unbeatable Italian, head to Coppa in Boston’s Southend.
  • Grab some New England Oysters at Island Creek Oyster Bar in Boston.
  • Have an artisan sandwich at Gulu Gulu Cafe in Salem, where you can catch live music and a rare assortment of craft beer.

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Autumnal colors frame a gondola on Mount Mansfield in Stowe, Vermont

Vermont

Say goodbye to city life as you journey further north into New England, a beloved US region characterized by quaint towns, colorful foliage and historical relevance.

Head through Vermont, a state known for its heavily forested terrain, the over 100 covered wooden bridges that populate the area, and its production of maple syrup. If you visit in the colder months, make sure to go skiing, and if it’s warmer, take a hike.

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  • Worth glimpsing is the unusual Rock of Ages, a working granite quarry in Graniteville, characterized by steep geometric rock shafts surrounded by turquoise water.
  • Keep an eye out for some of the 100 covered bridges throughout Vermont-- some dating all the way back to 1820.
  • Go hiking at the picturesque Mount Mansfield in the town of Underhill, Vermont.
Portland Head Light historic lighthouse in Cape Elizabeth, Maine

Maine

To continue your road trip, head toward the northernmost state in the Northeast: Maine.

This coastal state offers an abundance of stunning natural environments with plenty to do and see. Inhabited for centuries by indigenous people, the area that would become Maine saw its first European settlement in the early 1600’s. Today, the state retains influences from each of the different groups who have called Maine home.

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